Sports and Religion

There is no correlation. Success in sports takes hard work and dedication, while religion is simply based on an overactive imagination. (It’s really for the children!)

The Great Tim Tebow has it right. He is a religious individual, who follows what he believes. I love when religious people say, “Tebow is too much.” (I thought there was no limit to how much people are supposed to love their “god!”)

For the non-religious people who are bothered by Tebow’s faith proclamations, I understand why they are annoyed, but the so called religious people seem to be half-assing it when it comes to their faith; I don’t think they understand what is going on. Tebow clearly gets it.

Don’t be one of those idiots who thinks Tebow is actually thanking his “god” for helping him win the game. He is simply praising his “lord and savior” for allowing him to remain healthy; he knows that his imaginary friend who “reigns from Heaven above, with wisdom, power, and love” is not helping him win games. (Please allow the guy to believe whatever nonsense he wants to believe in!)

Tom Brady does the same thing; he believes men should wear UGG boots and he shouts it from the mountain tops. Like Tebow’s belief in “god,” I don’t agree with Brady’s endorsement of UGG boots, but who is to say, that he love of feminine footwear is too much? (If the guy wants to be a cross-dresser, let the guy do his thing!)

When David Ortiz hits a homerun and points to the sky, he is simply praising the jealous guy in the sky that he believes in; he is not thanking some all-powerful being for helping him hit the homerun. Please take the time to distinguish between athletes who praise a nonexistent being and the ones who believe that their success comes from the assistant of a “god.”

One aspect of sports that may cross the line is when players talk about winning a championship in honor of someone who is dead, or someone with a terminal illness. I don’t mind the fact that the Patsies wore patches on their shirts, in honor of their owner’s late wife, Myra. The problem I have is when players and fans talk about, “Myra is helping the team win, or Myra is watching over the team and giving the players strength.” I would honestly like for one if these idiots to please explain to me, why the Patsies lost, if Myra caused Billy Cundiff to miss an easy field goal. (Listening to such nonsensical thought makes me want to drive to the top of Mulholland drive and steer the car off of the cliff!)

When it comes to sports, religion is neither here nor there. (What a dumb saying. Obviously it has to be one of the two; if you are not here, then you are there!)

By the way, I prayed for “the lord” to help the Giants win. MY “GOD” IS AN AWESOME “GOD!”

For the greatest religious song of all time, check out this video. AWESOME

@PeteTeix617

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5 responses to “Sports and Religion

  1. I’m torn on this one…I think its comforting for people to believe that their departed loved ones are out there somewhere looking out for them. Yes, you shouldn’t ask for personal favors but I don’t think there’s any harm in dedicating something to someone you’ve lost or believing that they guided you through a tough situation.

    But I guess, that’s where your theory of once your dead that’s it comes in. Which I’m not sure you’re too convinced on either but like I’ve said a few times that’s a convo we need to have in person…soon!

    And leave Brady alone!! Damn u!! The man has suffered enough!

  2. Pingback: Second Chance Sunday {XLI} | Wacky Pete's Wicked & Wonderful Words of Wis-dumb

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